Cogut Institute for the Humanities

Postdoctoral Fellows

2020–22

  • Portrait of David Frank

    David Frank

    Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Philosophy and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities

    David Frank is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Philosophy and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities. His research focuses on values and ethics in environmental sciences. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy at the University of Texas in 2012 with a dissertation on the philosophy of conservation biology. He has since held postdoctoral positions at New York University, the University of North Carolina, and the University of Tennessee, developing research collaborations with environmental scientists and teaching courses on environmental ethics, research ethics, and philosophy of science. His current research focuses on philosophical controversies about invasive species, the ethics and economics of the Green New Deal, and the ethics of environmental health research.

  • Portrait of Dadland Maye

    Dadland Maye

    Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Africana Studies and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities

    Dadland Maye is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Africana Studies and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities. He earned his Ph.D. in English at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. He specializes in queer social justice movements, Africana studies, the Caribbean, and gender and sexuality studies. His book manuscript, “The Making of a Queer Caribbean: Grassroots, Dancehall, and Literary Advocacy (1975–2015)” analyzes literature, dancehall music, and grassroots organizations as three significant social justice movements. In utilizing an innovative and trans-disciplinary methodology grounded in ethnography, historical, and discourse analysis, the project provides critical new understandings of the constructions of gender and sexuality in the African diaspora. He is also working on a book of essays, “Erotic Testimonials, Hallelujah!,” that draws on his erotic experiences in Jamaica and the U.S. as didactic diasporic testimonies. The body of essays highlights that gay sex and sexuality have functioned as productive movements in disabling internalized racism, legacies of religious violence, and cultural homophobia. In conjunction with his writing, he rigorously attends to self-care through exercising, world traveling, and erotic self-awareness. As he sees it, these diverse embodiments of self-love are glory-centered articulations that nurture the urgency of diasporic solidarity and social justice.

2021-23

  • Portrait of Veronica Fitzpatrick

    Veronica Fitzpatrick

    Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Modern Culture and Media and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities

    Veronica Fitzpatrick is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Modern Culture and Media and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities. She earned her Ph.D. in English and Film & Media Studies at the University of Pittsburgh with a dissertation on representational and epistemological instability in modern horror and holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Notre Dame. Her current research is a book-length close reading of “The Bachelor” franchise’s trademark language, which draws on etymology, film theory, affect studies, and ordinary language philosophy to diagram precisely how, under the guise of “reality,” this hyper-produced fantasy phenomenon registers and refines our working definitions of intimacy and authenticity. In addition to her scholarship and teaching, she is a co-editor of World Picture and editor-at-large at Bright Wall/Dark Room, where she regularly contributes criticism.

  • Photo of Adrián Emmanuel Hernández-Acosta

    Adrián Hernández-Acosta

    Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities in the Department of Hispanic Studies and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities

    Adrián Emmanuel Hernández-Acosta is a Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities in the Department of Hispanic Studies and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities, where he teaches courses in Hispanophone Caribbean literature with a focus on formations of race, gender, and sexuality in the afterlife of racial slavery and under duress of colonial structures. He is also affiliated with the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, the Department of American studies, and the Ethnic Studies concentration. His research and teaching explore the literary, religious, and theoretical aspects of 20th- and 21st-century Dominican, Puerto Rican, and Cuban texts. His current project develops the concept of “mortuary poetics” to examine the vital roles played by mourning in representations of African diaspora religions within contemporary Hispanophone Caribbean literature. He earned a Ph.D in the study of religion and an M.A. in Romance languages and literatures from Harvard University as well as an M.Div from Harvard Divinity School. He has served as Assistant Managing Editor for Transforming Anthropology, the flagship journal of the Association of Black Anthropologists, and his creative nonfiction is published on public platforms such as ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America, Political Theology Network, and La Respuesta Magazine.

  • Portrait of Mariah Min

    Mariah Min

    Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities in the Department of English, the Program in Medieval Studies, and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities

    Mariah Min is a Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities in the Department of English, the Program in Medieval Studies, and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities. Her book manuscript, “Figure Writing: Technologies of Character in Medieval Literature,” examines medieval literary characters in order to disentangle the longstanding conflation of character and human subjectivity within both critical and popular discourse. She demonstrates that medieval character—with its visible seams of construction—can reframe characterization as a tactic deployed by the text rather than an unmediated depiction of psychology; this enables us to recognize the ideological underpinnings of characterization as a literary technique and to ask for what ends the figure of the human is deployed, in contexts ranging from medieval literature to contemporary political rhetoric. Through her research and teaching, she aims to resist the isolation of medieval studies within English, speaking across periods in order to shed light on medieval materials through modern lenses, but also to refine modern lenses through medieval case studies.

  • Portrait of Emily Rogers

    Emily Lim Rogers

    Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of American Studies, the Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS), and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities

    Emily Lim Rogers is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of American Studies, the Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS), and the Cogut Institute for the Humanities. She teaches courses at the intersection of disability studies, STS, the medical humanities, gender/sexuality studies, and the history of capitalism. She received her Ph.D. in American studies at New York University, where she also spent three years as the administrator for the Center for Disability Studies. Her research considers the incomplete medicalization of chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis or ME/CFS. The project probes what scientific uncertainty reveals about the fraught gendered and racialized dynamics that determine who is allowed to be ill, and examines the uneven uptake of debility in the sociocultural context of the United States.